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Technologies : J2EE - .NET .

 

 

http://insight.zdnet.co.uk/software/applications/0,39020466,2122091,00.htm

Description not available.

 

http://books.mcgraw-hill.com/cgi-bin/pbg/0072230541.html

.NET & J2EE Interoperability

 

http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-07-2002/jw-0726-j2eevsnet2.html

In Part 2 of this two-part series, Humphrey Sheil and Michael Monteiro shift from the theoretical to the practical by demonstrating how to employ J2EE (Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition) and Microsoft .Net to develop a concrete Web application. By detailing a standard Web application's design, construction, and deployment using both technologies, you'll see the concrete similarities and differences between them.

 

http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-06-2002/jw-0628-j2eevsnet.html

Heard a lot about .Net versus J2EE (Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition)? Wondering what that conflict means for you? Well, we wondered the same thing. So, drawing on our combined experiences from both sides of the fence, we put together an unbiased explanation as to how J2EE and .Net match up. Make no mistake, finding unbiased opinions is difficult—both camps' marketing hype has kicked into overdrive. This two-part series will help you better understand how the two technologies differ and how they are alike, all in the context of building a Web application from design right through to deployment

 

http://www.objectwatch.com/FinalJ2EEandDotNet.doc

Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) versus The .NET Platform Two Visions for eBusiness by Roger Sessions ObjectWatch, Inc.

 

http://java.oreilly.com/news/farley_0800.html

The .NET platform has an array of technologies under its umbrella. Microsoft is ostensibly presenting these as alternatives to other existing platforms, like J2EE and CORBA, in order to attract developers to the Windows platform. But how do the comparisons play out item-by-item?

 

Five reasons against migrating Java EJB applications to .NET

The .NET Framework has been touted as the next big thing for the distributed computing community. Redesigned from the bottom up, Microsoft’s newest offering has made marked progress in areas such as XML integration, error handling, component processing, and reusable frameworks. The promise for Web development is clear: faster development, less custom coding, and increased stability. But what if your current application is currently a Java EJB implementation? Is it worth the cost and effort to migrate to Microsoft’s new platform? While the benefits of .NET over Java EJB certainly will be debated for years to come, the difficulties involved with such a platform port are a little more predictable. Even assuming a compelling technical or business reason driving the requirement, here are five good reasons not to migrate your Java or J2EE applications to .NET.

 

http://www.theserverside.com/resources/article.jsp?l=J2EE-vs-DOTNET

In this whitepaper, we will make a powerful comparison between the two choices that businesses have for building XML-based web services: the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE)1 , built by Sun Microsystems and other industry players, and Microsoft.NET2, built by Microsoft Corporation.

 

http://www.looselycoupled.com/stories/2003/dotnet-j2ee-dev0807.html

Bridging the gap between .NET and J2EE The question is not whether you should develop web services in .NET or J2EE. The question is, how do you get them to interoperate?

 

http://www.developer.com/tech/article.php/977781

Article has information about Microsoft Corp. tool for converting Java applications into extensible .NET versions.

 

http://www.chrispeiris.com/seminar_eds_sydney.asp?m=se

Description not available.

 

http://www.stardeveloper.com/articles/display.html?article=2003032802&page=1

Description not available.

 

http://www.programmersheaven.com/search/download.asp?FileID=22899

Description not available.

 

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/Code/2003/March/J2EEtoDotNet.asp

The link provides quick tips and useful code snippets to get you started to migrate a J2EE based application to a .NET based application. It also provides sample code and the corresponding .NET code. It also provides a technology mapping between the two platforms.

 

http://developers.sun.com/sw/building/tech_articles/async_paper.html

This article is intended for developers already familiar with Web service technologies such as the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and .NET. If you don't have this background, please refer to the tutorials listed in Learning More.

 

http://www.devx.com/SummitDays/Article/6918

Porting Java Code to .NET--Using J#.NET J#.NET compiles Java programs for the .NET platform, and includes .NET implementations of Java class libraries to make it easier to port much of your Java code with only minor rewriting. Here's what it looks like, what it includes and can do, its limitations, and the porting options its tools provide.

 

http://www.devx.com/SummitDays/Article/6918

Porting Java Code to .NET--Using J#.NET J#.NET compiles Java programs for the .NET platform, and includes .NET implementations of Java class libraries to make it easier to port much of your Java code with only minor rewriting. Here's what it looks like, what it includes and can do, its limitations, and the porting options its tools provide.

 

http://builder.com.com/5100-6390-1050006.html

Many IT managers with Microsoft infrastructures are debating whether their development efforts should be moved to .NET. Microsoft promises greater efficiency and programmer productivity with .NET, while allowing VB and C++ developers unprecedented power and rapid application design (RAD) tools. Microsoft has even introduced a new language, C#, designed specifically to work with the .NET Framework. While there are many purported benefits of .NET, IT managers are understandably wary. The technology is new, which means that finding successful, mission-critical applications written in .NET can be difficult. And the learning curve for the .NET Framework is not trivial; VB developers sometimes find the move to VB.NET to be more complex than any previous version upgrade. Despite these costs, there are some strong arguments in favor of making the move.

 

 

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